Q: Having the developing solution splashed onto the film before processing will result in:
radiology, developing solution, errors, dental hygiene exam prep

Q: Having the developing solution splashed onto the film before processing will result in:

radiology, developing solution, errors, dental hygiene exam prep

Q: Having the developing solution splashed onto the film before processing will result in:

(A). Brown stain
(B). Dark spots
(C). White spots
(D). Yellow stain

Keyword: developing

  • The developing solution creates “dark” areas on a developed film. Therefore, if the developing solution was unintentionally spilled or splashed onto the film, those affected areas will appear as dark spots when the image is developed.
  • The fixing solution creates “light” areas on a developed film. Therefore, contamination with the fixer solution will cause white spots.
  • Insufficient washing or exhausted solution can create brown and yellow stains.

Answer: (B). Dark spots

Wake Up Memory Technique (WMT) for the Dental Hygiene Boards

At StudentRDH dental hygiene boards online review, I try to explain the concept of film developing using the analogy of baking. This time, let’s try this with our special Wake Up Memory Technique (WUMT):

  • See the letter “D” in Developer and match it with the “D” in D Developer spots are Dark.

Learn more for the dental hygiene boards

Now automatically, you know that fixer spots are “light.” Do you want to learn more about radiology? I think you do because there is NO rest for the #DHstudent! Let’s quickly review the highlights of chemicals used in the developer and fixer. This information is straight from the radiology summary StudentRDH provides part of the STEP-by-STEP Boards review course.

o   Developing: 5 minutes at 68° F (the higher the temperature the faster the process).

o   Reducing agent: hydroquinone or elon – reduces exposed silver halide crystals into black metallic silver.
o   Alkalizer: sodium carbonate – softens film emulsion and speeds up action.
o   Restrainer: potassium bromide – inhibits the development of unexposed silver halide crystals.
o   Preservative: sodium sulfite – a preservative that prevents oxidation.

o   Fixing: 10 minutes, or twice developing time.

o   Fixing agent: sodium thiosulfate – clears unexposed silver halide crystals.
o   Hardener: potassium alum – shrinks and hardens emulsion.
o   Acidifier: acetic acid – keeps medium acidic and stops additional development.
o   Preservative: sodium sulfite – prevents oxidation.

And to tie it back to our chemical splashes, see that a developer creates dark spots on the images, therefore a developer splash turn black. On the other hand, the fixer created light areas by clearing crystals. With a fixer splash, you will see white areas. Does this all make send to you now?

At StudentRDH, we always try to provide memory tricks so we can stay the best online prep course for the dental hygiene boards. The goal is to get to the finish line, but faster and smarter.

Have another amazing day! Happy studying!

Related post in Radiology: Radiolucency in radiograph

(Disclaimer: StudentRDH is NOT affiliated with the NBDHE, NDHCE, CSCE, CDCA, WREB.)

Written by
Claire Jeong, RDH, MS

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