Q: The bluish tone of the teeth can be related to:
dental anatomy, dentinogenesis imperfecta, dental hygiene exam prep

Q: The bluish tone of the teeth can be related to:

dental anatomy, dentinogenesis imperfecta, dental hygiene exam prep

Q: The bluish tone of the teeth can be related to:

(A). Dentin dysplasia
(B). Amelogenesis imperfecta
(C). Dentinogenesis imperfecta
(D). Anodontia

Dentinogenesis imperfecta is an inherited disorder that affects the tooth development. It can create teeth that are opalescent and brown/blue in color. The dentin is soft, which causes the enamel to chip off. On radiographic images, the teeth may show little or no pulp chambers. In some other types of dentinogenesis imperfecta, the dentin is thin and the pulp chamber is abnormally large.

Let’s look at the other conditions:

  • Dentin dysplasia is also an inherited disorder and occurs much less frequently (1 in 6,000) than dentinogenesis imperfecta (1 in 100,000). The characteristics of dentin dysplasia are similar to dentinogenesis imperfecta. The pulp chambers in dentin dysplasia are described to resemble a “half-moon” or “bow-tie” shape.
  • Amelogenesis imperfecta is also an inherited disorder characterized by small, discolored, pitted, and weak crowns. Discoloration is not a characteristic of the condition, and the pulp chambers are not affected.
  • Anodontia is the congenital lack of all primary or permanent teeth.

Answer: (C). Dentinogenesis imperfecta

Learn more for the dental hygiene boards

The important part here is to remember the information with key words. Reading the definitions will NOT get you to the finish line. You have to put the extra effort to make them into a summary form. Let’s try it here, together.

  • Amelogenesis imperfecta: discoloration, pitting, pulp chambers not affected
  • Dentinogenesis imperfecta: brown, blue, chipping, no pulp chambers
  • Dentin dysplasia: “half-moon” or “bow-tie” shape pulp chamber

You will see case studies in your dental hygiene board examinations, whether it is the US or Canadian National boards (NBDHE, NDHCE). The case studies will include images and radiographs. Therefore, it is important that you match the key words you see in the patient’s condition description with the signs you see on the images. All of them are clues given by the examiners for you to PASS the boards! If you want to learn more about the guidelines for the dental hygiene boards and read the full blueprint from the association, here they are:

Have a fabulous day!

Related post in dental anatomy: Black line stain

Author: Claire RDH, MS

(Disclaimer: StudentRDH is NOT affiliated with the NBDHE, NDHCE, CSCE, CDCA, WREB.)

Written by
Claire Jeong, RDH, MS

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