Q: Which abnormality is related to two tooth buds merging into one?
dental anatomy, fusion, gemination, dental hygiene board exam

Q: Which abnormality is related to two tooth buds merging into one?

dental anatomy, fusion, gemination, dental hygiene board exam

Q: Which abnormality is related to two tooth buds merging into one?

(A). Fusion
(B). Concrescence
(C). Gemination
(D). Dens in dente

  • Gemination is the result of a crown splitting in two, which can give the appearance of two crowns merged together. With gemination, the root is not affected, and therefore there is only one root.
  • Fusion is the result of two tooth buds merging into one, which can give the appearance of one large crown. With fusion, the roots can also be “fused,” giving the appearance of one root. However, depending on the stage of the tooth fusion occurred, the affected teeth can still have two pulp chambers. Therefore, it is incorrect to say that there is “one root.”
  • Concrescence is the result of two roots adhering to each other by cementum, giving it the appearance of one root. With concrescence, the crowns are not affected.
  • Dens in dente is the result of malformation of a tooth crown, which can give the appearance of the tooth enamel going into the crown.

Answer: (A). Fusion

Learn more for the dental hygiene boards

But how can you differentiate fusion from gemination, when the clinical appearance of teeth affected by such abnormalities can be the same. The only answer is; the teeth must be counted. If there is one more “tooth” than normal, it is gemination. If there is one less “tooth” than normal, it is fusion.

About StudentRDH step-by-step solution

More straight to the point study guides can be found under the chapter of Dental Anatomy for the National dental hygiene board exams If you already have the FULL package subscription, I suggest that you review more on this topics – abnormalities. At StudentRDH, we have broken down this topic into 3 smaller categories – Abnormalities of hereditary origin, abnormalities in number and size, abnormalities in tooth formation. The goal is to get a checkmark after each sub category. The brain is immediately rewarding with the “small wins” and you will find studying much more fun. As some past users say, “studying can be addicting with the right tool.” If you are using a textbook for the dental hygiene boards review such as Mosby or Saunder, create small sections yourself. Do NOT try to read the 50 different abnormalities at the same time. That would be eating everything in your fridge at once. Instead, study in small increments, and “digest” the content.

There is a strategy to our StudentRDH program. Even if you don’t use our online course, here are some tips that can help you get to the finish line faster. In this related post called “Productivity made simple: the Pomodoro technique explained,” see again the topic of small victories. In this case, 25 minutes at a time.

I hope that StudentRDH Vitamins are providing you with a ton of juicy content. Everyday, study little by little. It will be all worth it at the end. Did you know that we have a FREE trial? Study with no commitment and if the STEP-by-STEP system is for you. If you are already with StudentRDH, high five to you! Keep shining!

Related post in Anatomy: Which part of the ethmoid bone attaches to the meninges?

(Disclaimer: StudentRDH is NOT affiliated with the NBDHE, NDHCE, CSCE, CDCA, WREB.)

Written by
Claire Jeong, RDH, MS
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